Germany calls for speeding up adoption of zero-emission powered vehicles

Zero emission or hydrogen fuel cell powered vehicles, could be the norm in the European Union.

Not content with just financial incentives to wean consumers off gas guzzling automobiles, Germany plans to usher in a new age of pollution-free cars. Germany’s Bundesrat has passed a resolution calling for a ban on new internal combustion engine cars by 2030.

Although resolutions aren’t legally binding, but if this was to become law, consumers will have the option to either buy a hydrogen fuel cell powered vehicle or an all-electric vehicle.

What this resolution is doing is asking the European Commission to implement the ban across the EU. There is a high probability that this could soon become EU policy.

Furthermore, the council also wants the European Commission to review its taxation policies and their effect on the “stimulation of emission-free mobility.” It isn’t clear what exactly this means.

While it could mean that they are suggesting a stronger incentive scheme for consumers who buy zero-emission cars, however, it could also mean that these consumers will have to pay the car’s full price – no tax incentives.

Auto manufacturers are worried that tougher emission norms could be the end of diesel – if the cost of ownership becomes prohibitively high, no one is going to purchase them.

This however, need not be something to be worried about, notes Forbes, since the registrations of new diesel vehicles, have dropped significantly across the EU.

If the European Commission were to come out with tax incentives for consumers for zero-emission or hydrogen fuel cell powered vehicles, a ban would only be the logical end of the combustion engine.

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