Afghanistan Threats Against Bring US And Pakistan Face-To-Face

The Taliban’s capture of Kabul has heightened mutual animosity between the United States and Pakistan, two ostensible partners who have clashed over Afghanistan. However, both parties continue to rely on one another.

With the Biden administration searching for alternative ways to combat terrorist threats in Afghanistan, it is likely to come back to Pakistan, which remains vital to US intelligence and national security due to its closeness to Afghanistan and ties to the Taliban commanders currently in control.

Over the course of the war which stretched for two decades, American officials accused Pakistan of playing a double game by pledging to combat terrorism and work with Washington while nurturing the Taliban and other terrorist organisations that fought US soldiers in Afghanistan. 

Over the course of the war which stretched for two decades, American officials accused Pakistan of playing a double game by pledging to combat terrorism and work with Washington while nurturing the Taliban and other terrorist organisations that fought US soldiers in Afghanistan.  

Meanwhile, Islamabad referred to what it perceived as broken pledges of setting up of a friendly government in Kabul after the US ousted the Taliban from the Afghan government after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks, as extremist organisations sought shelter in eastern Afghanistan and conducted devastating assaults across Pakistan.

However, the United States desires Pakistani help in counterterrorism activities and may seek authorization to fly surveillance aircraft into Afghanistan or other intelligence collaboration.

And, while openly celebrating the Taliban’s ascension to power, Pakistan seeks US military assistance and strong relations with Washington.

“Over the last 20 years, Pakistan has been vital for various logistics purposes for the U.S. military. What’s really been troubling is that, unfortunately, there hasn’t been a lot of trust,” said U.S. Rep. Raja Krishnamoorthi, an Illinois Democrat who sits on the House Intelligence Committee. “I think the question is whether we can get over that history to arrive at a new understanding.”

Veteran diplomats and intelligence personnel from both countries argue that the events of the previous two decades, as well as Pakistan’s ongoing rivalry with India, have severely restricted the prospects for collaboration. The former Afghan government, which had considerable support from New Delhi, frequently accused Pakistan of sheltering the Taliban. The new Taliban leadership includes people who have long been suspected of having ties to Pakistan’s intelligence agency, the Inter-Services Intelligence.

Former Pakistani ambassador to the United States Husain Haqqani said he recognised “the desire of officials in both nations to try to take advantage of the situation” and find common ground. However, Haqqani stated that he expects Pakistan to provide “all possible support to the Taliban.”

“This has been a moment Pakistan has been waiting for 20 years,” said Haqqani, now at the Hudson Institute think tank. “They now feel that they have a satellite state.”

(Adapted from CNN.com)

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