T-Rays can boost computer memory speeds by 1000%

Although the results of their paper, published in Nature is promising, the researchers are yet to publish any test result on actual computer memory cells. Although the premise is very promising, it will take some more time to be operational in our computers.

While CPUs and GPUs speeds have increased considerably, one area in personal computing which could do with a speed boost is its memory.

Currently memory speeds are determined by how quickly individual memory cells can be switched ON & OFF using an external magnetic field. However, European and Russian scientists have come up with a method that capitalizes on terahertz radiation: the “T-rays,” commonly used in body scanners in airports.

Their research, published in Nature, involves swapping magnetic fields for T-Rays involves swapping magnetic fields for T-rays, resulting in the boosting of the cell-resetting process by a factor of 1000. The radiation is in fact a series of short electromagnetic pulses which ping the memory cells at terahertz frequencies.

Recent T-ray experiments have largely dealt with quick, precise inspections of organic and mechanical material. They have been typically used for scanning for awkward bulges in airports and for scanning for contrabands.

Other proposals for their usage includes looking into the innards of broken microchips, comb airport luggage for bomb, and peer into fragile manuscripts.

Although the researchers have successfully demonstrated the concept on thulium orthoferrite and ferromagnets, it’s unlikely that they will be adopted widely any time soon.

However, the researchers are yet to publish any tests on actual computer memory cells. Although the results are startlingly promising, they will take some more time to get inside our computers.

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